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Sauna +Heat Shock - What you need to know

Sauna +Heat Shock - What you need to know

One of the many healthy effects of the infrared light spectrum on humans is the increase in production of heat shock proteins (HSP). The response of the cellular structures to infrared wavelengths is what enhances the bloodstream's oxygenation.

Infrared sauna therapy increases HSP. The production of heat shock proteins have proven overall wellness in extensive studies.

As the radiant light waves are absorbed through and beyond the initial epidermis, it makes the mitochondria become more active. 

Through respiratory inhibition (a reaction with ubiquinol and O2 in the membrane), nitric acid stimulates production and reactive oxygen from mitochondria.

As a result, nitric acid improves the movement of blood circulation.

 

What Are Heat Shock Proteins?

The proteins that your body produces when you experience excessive temperature related situations, such as heat stress - this is called ‘heat shock protein’. 

It helps in maintaining the body's homeostasis, performing chaperone functions and reactivating malformed proteins.

By promoting proper protein folding, which happens in various disorders like obesity, atherosclerosis, and type 2 diabetes. HSP attempts the rehabilitation of cellular stress and metabolic diseases.

What Are Heat Shock Proteins? The proteins that your body produces when you experience excessive temperature related situations, such as heat stress - this is called ‘heat shock protein’.  It helps in maintaining the body's homeostasis, performing chaperone functions and reactivating malformed proteins. By promoting proper protein folding, which happens in various disorders like obesity, atherosclerosis, and type 2 diabetes. HSP attempts the rehabilitation of cellular stress and metabolic diseases.

HSP responds to body stress, which may come from extreme heat, calorie restriction, injuries, exercise, cancer, or due to old-age.

Extreme heat can damage your cells. However, heat shock proteins will act immediately to repair those damaged cells by overcompensation. 

For people who eat less or practice fasting like intermittent fasting, sauna therapy, and doing regular exercise, it can effectively help you live longer by producing more HSP’s in your body.

By storing HSP's, your body will be ready anytime something stressful happens, like a fever or a bad cold. 

Even if you are someone who's eating excessively, or not taking regular exercise, you can still boost your physical performance by a regular infrared sauna session because it supplements the effects of heat shock proteins.

It is one of the most effective methods you can use to induce heat stressors. Exposing yourself to the sauna's heat will trigger the release of these important HSP.

The same cardiovascular, extracellular proteins and hormonal responses are produced - and are also released during exercising. Heat shock is becoming popular at the moment because of the well-documented overall health benefits it can provide.

Infrared Sauna + HSP’s

Sauna therapy is one of the greatest ways to enhance the production of your body's HSP’s. Such therapy has been used as a popular form of hyperthermia and for a variety of other purposes, including anti-aging and promoting longevity. 

Infrared saunas are becoming popular because of the specific healthy wavelengths they produce which penetrate deep into the skin, deeper than a normal dry sauna.

Infrared Sauna + HSP’s Sauna therapy is one of the greatest ways to enhance the production of your body's HSP’s. Such therapy has been used as a popular form of hyperthermia and for a variety of other purposes, including anti-aging and promoting longevity.  Infrared saunas are becoming popular because of the specific healthy wavelengths they produce which penetrate deep into the skin, deeper than a normal dry sauna.   Sweating in an IR cabin helps you to gain and sustain a sweat easily.  It's comfortable, and does not cause a burning or stinging sensation. The average sauna sesh is around 15 - 30 minutes Since infrared saunas do not generate any humidity, it means the heat is drier and the session is longer, which is better because your body will absorb the infraheat internally, and not only through the air. It is easier to stay longer in an infrared sauna cabin, compared to traditional ones. Although they can produce the same amount of heat shock proteins, the longer you sweat, the healthier you get. (For beginners longer than 30 minutes is not recommended)

Sweating in an IR cabin helps you to gain and sustain a sweat easily.  It's comfortable, and does not cause a burning or stinging sensation. The average sauna sesh is around 15 - 30 minutes

Since infrared saunas do not generate any humidity, it means the heat is drier and the session is longer, which is better because your body will absorb the infraheat internally, and not only through the air.

It is easier to stay longer in an infrared sauna cabin, compared to traditional ones. Although they can produce the same amount of heat shock proteins, the longer you sweat, the healthier you get. (For beginners longer than 30 minutes is not recommended)

Study: Heat Stress and Cardiovascular, Hormonal, and Heat Shock Proteins in Humans

(source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3418130/

Regular exercise is a powerful nonpharmacologic treatment that can prevent and reduce the incidence of various age-related chronic diseases. 

However, only about 27% of the adult population engages in exercise at the recommended level to prevent chronic disease. 

Because of various injuries and disabilities (sports injury, osteoarthritis, spinal cord injury, aging), some people cannot participate in a regular activity for extended periods. 

In addition, some athletes and soldiers need to acclimate to high-heat environments to perform safely. 

A common element of exercise that has gained attention is increased body temperature, leading to profuse sweating and the triggering of cell chaperones and hormones. 

The physiologic value of safely increasing body temperature in the absence of exercise is the focus of this investigation.

When cells are exposed to thermal stress, stress proteins called heat shock proteins (HSPs) are upregulated intracellularly, and they are thought to serve as molecular chaperones to prevent protein aggregation and help transport repair proteins.

In addition to these well-characterized intracellular functions of HSPs, researchers have suggested that extracellular HSPs enhance the immune system. 

The most inducible and abundant, and therefore most studied, is HSP72, which was reclassified recently as HSPA1A.

Although various stressors can trigger the upregulation of HSP72, thermal stress appears to be one of the most effective stressors to increase the intracellular and extracellular concentrations of HSP72.

In humans, accumulating evidence has shown that intense exercise can increase extracellular HSP72. Associated with intense exercise is profuse sweating in response to the elevation in core body temperature. 

This raises the question of whether heat stress alone in the absence of exercise similarly triggers extracellular HSP72 in humans. 

Investigators have reported that the elevated extracellular HSP72 level with exercise is not attributed to the passive release of intracellular HSP72 from exercising muscles.

Instead, hepatosplanchnic organs were at least partly responsible for the active release of the HSP72 into the bloodstream, possibly for systemic use, indicating that mechanical stress is not necessary to increase the extracellular HSP72 level.

Furthermore, Fleshner et al showed that psychological rather than physical stress could trigger the systemic release of HSP72 in animal models.

Researchers have reported that an increase in extracellular HSP72 due to exercise was much greater than that due to passive heating.

However, they induced passive heat stress with water immersion, in which the head and face are not heated directly.

Whole-body heat stress that includes the head and face (ie, heat stress chamber) might effectively modulate cardiovascular, hormonal, and protective chaperones (extracellular HSP72). 

For example, cardiovascular work increases to stabilize blood pressure during heat-induced skin vasodilation. Hormones related to stressful stimuli (eg, catecholamines and prolactin) also should increase in the circulating blood. 

Prolactin, which is one of these hormones, is an indirect measure of dopaminergic-serotonergic transmitters in the brain.

The extent to which passive heat stress triggers a cascade of responses is the basis for this study. 

Therefore, the primary purpose of our study was to determine whether whole-body passive heat stress triggers cardiovascular (heart rate, blood pressure), hormonal (prolactin, catecholamines), and extracellular protein (HSP72) responses that commonly are reported during exercise. 

We hypothesized that whole-body heat stress would reproduce many of the responses observed with exercise. 

If passively increasing body temperature elicits many of the exercise-induced responses as hypothesized, whole-body heat stress might produce positive health adaptations during key periods of rehabilitation. 

Indeed, people who cannot exercise but need to maintain their fitness status (eg, injured athletes) might be able to use this as an alternative or supplemental intervention during key periods of recovery from injury.

 

Conclusion

The release of heat shock proteins can help create and release massive human growth hormone, which helps in maintaining your bone density, building muscle, improving heart function, and maintaining insulin levels.

Heat shock proteins are truly the real deal for a healthier version of you and  sauna use will help to release HSP, better than any other therapy. 

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