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How Does an Infrared Sauna Work?

How Does an Infrared Sauna Work?

How a Sauna Works (Infrared Versus Traditional)


Two types of saunas are used today. The most common type is the infrared sauna, but there is also the traditional sauna. Traditional saunas heat up the room using a wood-burning fire. A chimney must sit overtop the fire to keep eye irritants and smoke out of the sauna. This method can be effective for creating dry heat, but it also takes a long time to heat up the sauna room. Sometimes it may even take all day, depending on the size and design of the room itself.

Modern saunas often use infrared technology instead. It can be used in two different ways. The first, and most common, way that infrared is used is to heat up objects inside the sauna room. Usually, special rocks or charcoal are placed in the center of side of the room and heated to extreme temperatures. The right types of rocks will not crack or show any issues under this type of strain, but will very easily heat up the whole room with a dry heat. Other items can be used, but most saunas prefer to use rocks or charcoal.

 

The other way that infrared technology is used is by heating up the people in the sauna directly using infrared lights. This is a much more controversial method, and it’s not been accepted by as many sauna enthusiasts around the world, although it does have some supporters who say this method works the better than others.

Saunas are almost always made from cedar wood or another high-quality hardwood. Temperatures inside the room get too hot to use tiles, metal, or plastic, so wood must be used because it absorbs heat while remaining cool to the touch. When you’re dealing with 176+ degree temperatures, this is an important quality!

One side effect of using cedar wood for saunas is a rich scent coming from the

wood. You can tell an aged sauna house, because the wood will have a strong scent even when the room is not heated yet. The heat helps to bring out the intoxicating smell of the cedar wood, which in turn brings a more complete state of relaxation for those inside.

 

 

Health Benefits of Using a Sauna


People don’t just use saunas for the fun of it. There are actual proven medical benefits of saunas, although they might not be what you’ve heard. Unlike some myths say, saunas won’t help you with weight loss or remove toxins from the body. But, they will aid you in stress relief, help to lower your blood pressure (at least temporarily), relieve minor pains, and clean out your pores.

Stress relief is the single largest benefit of using a sauna. The heat penetrates deep into muscle tissues and causes your body to completely relax. It can help to ease pains and aches that are bothering you, further adding to the stress relief.

 

Your blood vessels dilate when exposed to dry heat like that of a sauna. When the vessels dilate, they stay that way for a while and blood flow increases around the body. It’s not just large vessels that open up wider; even the smaller blood vessels will open up. This is why saunas are good for your blood pressure, because they help to lower it by making your blood flow more efficient.

Better blood flow around the body is also responsible for some pain relief. People with chronic conditions have been known to feel some temporary relief when they use a sauna. To get the best pain relief, you’ll have to use the best infrared sauna multiple times per week.

Lastly, saunas open your pores and allow your whole body to sweat them clean. Clogged pores and acne might improve slightly, as long as you wash yourself well after the sauna session to remove all the sweat!

Conclusion

There’s nothing scary or mystical about a sauna. Some people find spiritual satisfaction from using them, but this is purely personal and has nothing to do with the medical science behind a saunas benefits. Using a sauna is relaxing, and it can improve your health with regular visits

 

https://www.thebaynet.com/articles/0317/how-do-saunas-actually-work.html

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